New Yorker is First Republican to Endorse Clinton

Drumroll please … the first Republican has endorsed Hillary Clinton.

Plenty of GOP-lers have been plenty discontent with their nominee. Then former Republican Michael Bloomberg attacked Trump while speaking at the Democratic convention.

But so far their disapproval against Trump has not turned into support for Clinton. Until today.

Richard Hanna, a Republican congressman from New York, wrote an op-ed in his hometown paper, where he publicly explained why he will vote for Hillary Clinton – and why others should follow him.

“For me, it is not enough to simply denounce his [Trump’s] comments: He is unfit to serve our party and cannot lead this country.

Secretary Clinton has issues that depending on where one stands can be viewed as great or small. But she stands and has stood for causes bigger than herself for a lifetime. That matters. Mrs. Clinton has promoted many of the issues I have been committed to over the years including expanding education and supporting women’s health care.

While I disagree with her on many issues, I will vote for Mrs. Clinton. I will be hopeful and resolute in my belief that being a good American who loves his country is far more important than parties or winning and losing. I trust she can lead. All Republicans may not like the direction, but they can live to win or lose another day with a real candidate. Our response to the public’s anger and the need to rebuild requires complex solutions, experience, knowledge and balance. Not bumper sticker slogans that pander to our disappointment, fear and hate.”

 

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Finally: Bernie Endorsed Hillary

So it finally happened. Five weeks after Hillary Clinton became the presumptive nominee, her opponent Bernie Sanders has conceded and officially endorsed her.

In his speech, Sanders thanked his supporters and vowed to make certain Clinton becomes the next president of the United Staes.

“I am proud of the campaign we ran here in New Hampshire and across the country. Our campaign won the primaries and caucuses in 22 states, and when the roll call at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia is announced it will show that we won almost 1,900 delegates. That is a lot of delegates, far more than almost anyone thought we could win. But it is not enough to win the nomination. Secretary Clinton goes into the convention with 389 more pledged delegates than we have and a lot more super delegates.

Secretary Clinton has won the Democratic nominating process, and I congratulate her for that. She will be the Democratic nominee for president and I intend to do everything I can to make certain she will be the next president of the United States.”

The endorsement came after weeklong negotiations between the two camps over the Democratic platform. There is a lot to be said about the possibility that Sanders lost political capital by waiting too long. After Elizabeth Warren followed President Obama in endorsing Hillary, the progressive darling attracted much attention away from Sanders.

And the fact that it took Sanders five full weeks to endorse Clinton is in stark contrast to Clinton herself – who started campaign for Obama only four days after her loss in 2008.