On the Ground with New Yorkers Volunteering for Clinton, Trump and Sanders

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After months of preparation and a three-week spree of intense campaigning, a radiant Hillary Clinton took to the stage in the ballroom of the Sheraton on Times Square. “There’s no place like home,” she told an energized crowd that repeatedly interrupted her with chants of “Hil-la-ry, Hil-la-ry.” In her New York primary victory speech, Clinton thanked all “the volunteers who have worked their hearts out” and encouraged others to sign up: “Be part of this campaign.”

Any presidential campaign needs volunteers, tens of thousands of enthusiastic supporters who give up their free time (and often their money) to champion their candidates. That’s no different in New York, where volunteers scoured the state going from door to door, making phone calls or organizing events.

And yet, volunteering varies — as a look at the Clinton, Trump and the suspended Sanders campaigns shows. Clinton’s volunteers are the most experienced and the most loyal, they are also closely tied to the offical campaign; Sanders’ were highly motivated, but loudly and vehemently demanded their independence, and Trump’s are few, and just as as outspoken and spur of the moment as the real estate mogul himself (shouting matches between volunteers and staffers included).

In that sense, the volunteers are a reflection of the candidates themselves.

A Lady Liberty Votes feature on Medium. Continue reading.

The Money Race: NY Students and Their Support for the Democratic Candidates

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Much has been said about the tremendous support Bernie Sanders has among young people. Take the New York primary: While Sanders lost by 16% in total, he received 65% of the young vote (the 18 to 29-year olds), according to exit polls.

Judging from this, a vast majority of college-aged New Yorkers voted for Sanders.

In New York, the Brooklyn-native also received a high amount of donations from students. But they didn’t have the same impact as those Hillary Clinton received from the same group, as a Lady Liberty Votes-analysis of filings with the Federal Election Commission shows.

Continue reading

Video Recap of Hillary’s Victory Night

Two days ago, I blogged about going to Hillary Clinton’s primary party in the Sheraton New York hotel. Here now is a video story I produced for NYU Now that  aired tonight.

Gets the enthusiasm of the night across a little better than just the photos 😉

With Karis Rogerson

How Every New York City Neighborhood Voted

By now you must have spent the last 24 hours on the moon to not know that Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump each won decisive victories in yesterday’s New York primaries.

With 99% of the precincts reported, Clinton got 58% of the vote compared to Sanders 42%. This 16%-lead means she received 39 delegates more than her opponent, which leaves Sanders little possibility to still win the nomination.

Trump scored even bigger, he got 64.8%  and almost all of the 95 Republican delegates up for grabs – 89. John Kasich came in a distant second, with 25.1% and 4 delegates. Ted Cruz – who refused to apologize for his New York Values comments – did not receive a single delegate, because he failed to meet the 20% threshold.

If you want to get all this in more detail, the New York Times created an awesome feature, where you can look up every single neighborhood in New York City.

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Screenshot © New York Times

As you can see, Hillary won large patches of Brooklyn, which shows that having the loudest supporters doesn’t necessarily mean you have the most.

My favorite example on the Republican side: Donald Trump won Trump Tower and the couple of Fifth Avenue blocks around it.

Hit your zip code to find out how your neighbors voted.

[New York Times]

Hillary Clinton Celebrates at Times Square Victory Party

Hillary Clinton had a good night. And so had her supporters.

This woman is showing off her Hillary suit, while she is waiting in line.

Clinton’s victory party was already well underway at the Sheraton Hotel in Times Square, when CNN’s Wolf Blitzer called the race for the former hometown senator.

The crowd alternated between “Hillary, Hillary!” and “I am with her!” cheers.

With 98% of the votes reported, Clinton led Sanders by 15.8%, a larger margin than even the most promising polls suggested.

The media’s view, the real party is hidden behind the press podium.

Before Clinton took to the stage herself, prominent surrogates – including mayor Bill de Blasio and Governor Andrew Cuomo – celebrated New York as a progressive democratic power house. 
  
And then the room full of supporters and volunteers finally got a glimpse of their candiate. Hillary Clinton entered the podium together with her husband Bill, her (very pregnant) daughter Chelsea and her son-in-law.

  
“Today you proved again, there’s no place like home,” a smiling Clinton told the cheering crowd.

The former Secretary of State only mentioned her opponent Sanders in passing, and instead put her focus on the general election. She repeatedly attacked Donald Trump and Ted Cruz – for example when she  gave her own definition of New York Values. 

Last Minute Voting Advice

If you need some last minute inspiration who to vote for in the Democratic primary, maybe some famous New Yorkers can sway you. The New York Times asked 10 of them who they are voting for. The list  includes Lena Dunham and Spike Lee, so check it out.  

[New York Times]

New Ad Boasts Trump’s New York Values

Less than 7 hours until we know who has won the New York primary. Plenty of time to do some last-minute campaigning.

Donald Trump for example jut tweeted out this new campaign ad, highlighting his story and his New York values.

 

Film Student Wants a Female President

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Kate Phillips, 26, in the Manhattan phone bank for Hillary Clinton. It was her first time volunteering.

Name: Kate Phillips
Borough: Manhattan
I will vote: Hillary Clinton

“I felt it was time [to volunteer]. I have been supporting Hillary since 2008 and now it’s getting tight. It’s getting close with Bernie, the New York Primary is coming up, and I just feel like young people are really vocal about Bernie. Young people aren’t vocal about Hillary – I really don’t understand why, she is a fabulous candidate. So I thought, I should put my money where my mouth is and volunteer.”

“I have been supporting her for a long time. First of all, just a 100%, I really think it’s very importantly to have a woman president, that’s just a fact. Still, I am not going to vote for Carly Fiorina, obviously.”

“Other than that, she is easily the most experienced. There are huge issues abroad, so much shit happening. She has been Secretary of State – in any other election year if she wasn’t a woman, I don’t think it would be an issue at all. I mean she is clearly the most experienced.”

Don’t Forget to Vote, New York

Only one more day before the primary circus moves on. And yes, with all the media craze and constant rallies we had in the last two weeks, it’s about time.

But before that, there is one important thing to do: go and vote!

To be prepared, here are the four most important points from my guide on how to vote in the New York primary.

  • Where do I need to go on Primary Day?
    Use the online Poll Site Locator to find your polling site.
  • What if I am at work and can’t get to vote?
    According to New York election law, you can take up to two hours at the beginning or end of your shift (with pay) to vote if you do not have sufficient time outside of work to vote.The law considers four consecutive hours between your shift and the opening/closing of the polls as sufficient time. If you need to take work off, you need to inform your employer at least two days before the primary.
  • Can I decide spontaneously in which primary I want to vote?
    No. New York State has closed primaries, that means you can vote only in the primary of the party you are registered for.
  • Who can I vote for?
    The Democrats have two candidates on the ballot: Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton.The Republicans have six candidates on the ballot, even though some of them have already suspended their campaign: Donald J. Trump, Jeb Bush, John Kasich, Marco Rubio, Ben Carson and Ted Cruz.
    You can only vote for these listed candidates, in the primary there aren’t any write-ins.